Hogeschool van Amsterdam

UNED

Join us in Amsterdam for the United States of America – Netherlands Education Symposium

Symposium

The UNED Annual Symposium will be held each spring and is an important event in the English teaching and research calendar.

UNED

This one day symposium is a platform for Fulbright English Teaching Assistants to present the results of the research they have carried out whilst teaching at schools in the Netherlands.
It is also the opportunity for schools, theorists, policy makers and teachers to exchange ideas with fellow professionals from other sectors involved in ELT. 

Program

12.50 Room open (Kohnstammzaal, room KSH 9A10 in the Kohnstammhuis)
13.10 Welcome by the Dean of the Faculty of Education, Dr Ramon Puras and Consul General David McCawley
13.30 Keynote by Liz Dale
Liz is well-known in the CLIL world for her books on bilingual education. At the HvA her research focuses on drawing up a validated profile of English teacher roles, language teaching methodologies and challenges faced by practising teachers in bilingual schools in the Netherlands. She is interested in the professional roles teacher education should prepare English teacher trainees for in bilingual education.
14.30 – 15.30 Research presentations
Due to popular request the research presentations will take the form of interactive poster presentations. These will be presented in market style which will allow you to see, listen and ask questions to all eight teaching assistants.
15.30  – 15.45 Coffee Break
15.45 – 16.15 Round Table discussion: “Dutch education from an American perspective” led by Louise Taylor coordinator of the minor Teaching in English and English Teacher at HvA and president of the Dutch association of primary English teacher trainers.
16.15 – Drinks

Location

Kohnstammhuis
Wibautstraat 2-4
1091 GM Amsterdam

UNED speakers

Student Research Poster presentations Extra information presentation
Abby Dorfman Relating the twentieth century history in the Netherlands to changes in educational policy for Vocational Education (MBO) Poster Abby Dorfman  
Anne Kuhnen Bilingual (TTO) Program Implementation in Dutch Vocational (MBO) Schools Poster Anne Kuhnen  
Colleen Lawson Thornton Making It Work: the Impact of Work Culture on Teacher Satisfaction Poster Colleen Lawson Thornton  
Kate Berger Unpacking Underachievement: HBO Student Perspectives Poster Kate Berger  
Kelli Panera Using Games to Improve Motivation Poster Kelli Panera  
Melissa Madden Strengthening Vocational Education: Applying Lessons from the Netherlands to the United States Poster Melissa Madden References
Rosa Schwartzburg The Impact of Shifting Population Demographics and Economic Metrics on School Culture: A Case Study Poster Rosa Schwartzburg  
Simone Robins Let’s Play a Game: Building English Language Confidence Through Small Group Play and Practice Poster Simone Robins  

Click on the names below to learn more about the speakers and their research.
 

Relating the twentieth century history in the Netherlands to changes in educational policy for Vocational Education (MBO)

Since the culmination of WWII many changes to educational policy have taken place. To ensure that all students have access to higher education, the Netherlands have re-shaped their educational system to meet the needs of the time. This comparison study will follow one MBO school through the middle of the twentieth century and compare historical events to policy shifts. This case-study will explore these changes, their successes, fails, and reveal plans for the future.

Bilingual (TTO) Program Implementation in Dutch Vocational (MBO) Schools

The decision to implement a bilingual education track requires a deliberate focus on training and ongoing support for teachers both in linguistic and methodological preparation. My research identifies deficiencies in one school's implementation process and provides recommendations for improvement based on interviews, observations, and strategies used in other bilingual programs.

Making It Work: the Impact of Work Culture on Teacher Satisfaction

Recently, the Netherlands has been ranked #1 in the world for work-life balance, meaning that the Dutch typically have a high level of satisfaction with the amount of time they spend at work and the expectations at their jobs. This project delves into how Dutch work culture directly relates to teacher satisfaction at an MBO school in Zuid Holland through qualitative measures, and draws comparisons between Dutch and US work cultures to look at how a school’s work culture impacts teacher satisfaction and retention.

Unpacking Underachievement: HBO Student Perspectives

The Hogeschool van Amsterdam’s (HvA) English teacher training program is founded upon excellence in not only English proficiency but also pedagogical teaching ability. However, the HvA’s high standards have been met with a surprisingly low retention rate, with more than half of the first-year students not making it to their second year. Using the first-years’ English Language Skills exam as an entry point into unpacking student underachievement within the program, the researcher conducted semi-structured interviews with a cohort of first-year students. This presentation will focus on insights gained from students’ own perspectives of and experiences within the program and how this may differ between students who passed the first exam and students who did not.

Using Games to Improve Motivation

This presentation will focus on how instruction should be formulated in order to promote students to speak in the target language. It will discuss literature on the reasons why students are reluctant to speak in the target language. The presentation will also discuss peer reviewed research to provide evidence for the use of games to improve intrinsic motivation. Lastly, the presentation will focus on the implementation of a vocabulary game into a classroom setting to create an authentic approach to instruction.

Strengthening Vocational Education: Applying Lessons from the Netherlands to the United States

This research explores the purposes of schooling from a Dutch perspective, and how these purposes have shaped the Dutch vocational education system. Through interviews with teachers and students at an MBO school in the Netherlands, I examine student and teacher perspectives on students’ educational experiences. These findings highlight strengths and shortcomings of the Dutch vocational education system when it comes to job placement and equity, respectively. I propose which elements of the Dutch vocational education system could be transferable to the American schooling context.

The Impact of Shifting Population Demographics and Economic Metrics on School Culture: A Case Study

This qualitative review examines how expectations of students, faculty, and families have shifted in the past decade in a semi-rural Dutch secondary school, and its impacts on those individuals in their learning environments. Focusing on the reasons for and cultural impact of declining student enrolment, as well as shifting economic impacts on families and faculty alike, this study examines school culture from the inside out. Through interviews, class evaluations, and research, I seek to find out how school culture is contextualized by the exterior social and political schema. This study will marry the macrosociological — the greater community of central Gelderland — with the microsociological — the individual relationships formed between students and teachers.

Let’s Play a Game: Building English Language Confidence Through Small Group Play and Practice

In this study I will test whether small group conversation and speaking practice held once every other week will improve student scores on language anxiety. I administered E. van Batenburg’s English Skill survey before my intervention and I will use the same survey to measure the students post-intervention. I plan to hold 15 minute sessions with groups of 6 students from BG1 and BG2. Using the pre-test I have identified students who received the lowest scores and have the most negative attitudes towards English relative to their classmates. I will organize groups to include each level of student within each group. I hope to see improvement, especially in some of the low scoring students as a result of these speaking practice sessions.

UNED online

For those who were unable to join us in Amsterdam on May 17th, we have posted the event online:

UNED and you?

If you would like to be involved in UNED 2019, please contact info@uned.nl.

Gepubliceerd door  Faculteit Onderwijs en Opvoeding 8 juni 2018